pronunciation's questions - English 1answer

705 pronunciation questions.

This affricate is not present in consonant tables for English language found in my textbooks. I do not trust them too much, because they omit some other English sounds too. I wonder mainly about ...

I usually pronounce "will you" as "/wɪ/ + /lju:/", but seems that people have some troubles understanding me (at least here in the UK). Is my pronunciation wrong? That's the way we usually make the ...

Is there any known pronunciation rule that justifies the p in "receipt" not being pronounced, does it have to do with the origin of the word or something or how it is? Why the p in "receipt" is not ...

I’m confused with these two sounds when they are at the end of the syllable. I know that “ch” and “j” are comprised of two sound: tsh and dzh respectively. So I think words like teach and page are ...

I know it's silly, but it's been bugging me for a while. Namely, the word unimportant and combination "an important". Whenever I pronounce them I cant' get rid of a feeling that they sound the same, ...

Say we have an acronym or abbreviation like SSH (Secure Shell). What is the correct form of the following phrase? 1) An SSH console 2) A SSH console I tend to use the first because it "sounds" right. ...

Below is an example of what I mean. Is there something similar to this but for English? This is a Japanese prosody tools developed by labs at The University of Tokyo. You can try inserting this ...

As you know the "h"s in the words "him", "his", "he", "her" and "hers", if there is a consonant before them, can be dropped. For example the "h" in the sentence "Why does he like you so much?" can be ...

Why does IELTS read [ˈaɪelts] when the I starts the word "International" so IELTS should read [jelts] instead. Is it an exception?

When you pronounce the phrase 'pick it up' as a native speaker, is there any word in it that need to be pronounce higher in pitch with more stress? This is how I pronounce it in American English. I'm ...

I have two tutorials by Cook and by Cameron. Cameron suggests that these two groups are pronounced differently: e.g. in "drop" the tongue is perfectly flat, but in "jaw" it goes up by 1/8 of an inch. ...

I'm having a hard time to make 'also' and 'all' sound correct. My native American tutor told me my 'also' sounds like 'arso' and 'all' sounds like "or". He says I have no trouble with making "L" ...

Can we ignore the final sound -ge as speaking the following sentence? "Having true consciousness can change someone's life."

In ESPN videos (1, 2), Boston Celtics was pronounced as /sel-tik/, but the dictionary says both /kel-tik/ and /sel-tik/ are acceptable pronunciations and clicking the sound icon on the dictionary ...

Today I heard in two (totally unrelated) videos the same unexpected pronunciation of the word 'assume' by native speakers. Googling came up with /əˈsjuːm/ both for English and American pronunciation (...

I know the pronunciation of the word in its traditional sense. Lately I’ve been researching fitness largely via online videos, and whenever someone refers to motion transforming rotation into back-and-...

I have thought that FEEL would sound like this:FEE-L Then I knew it sounds like FEE-ul. I understand that it is the L sound that makes it sound like vowel sound of hEAR. I’m still not clear of FILL. ...

In English language there are innumerable Acronyms, but what I don’t know is that when do we pronounce an acronym as one word and when as separate Letters? For Instance, UNICEF is pronounced /...

I am wondering how to pronounce "in that", where in that is a synonym for because. I have little understanding of reduction. Is it right to pronounce it /inə/?

What's the correct pronunciation of the name Geoff? Is it like "Jeff" or more like "GEE-off" or something else?

I tried online voice synthesis and it sounds indistinguishable to my Russian ear: https://translate.google.com/#en/ru/quean%20vs%20queen How am I supposed to pick up the difference if the context in ...

As you know in American English if the "d" or "t" is between two vowels in a word or if it is at the end of a word after a vowel and before a word that starts with a vowel, it is pronounced as a flap ...

Ion /ˈaɪən $ ˈaɪən, ˈaɪɑːn/ (LDOCE Online) OR Ion UK ​ /ˈaɪ.ɒn/ US ​ /ˈaɪ.ɑːn/ (Cambridge Dictionary) Why does the pronunciation of these two words differ in these two sites?

To my Russian ear, it appears that both nozzle and nuzzle sound the same. Is it true? If no, what is the difference?

Why is height pronounced as hi, but weight is pronounced as wei? Someone suggest me a good book to learn such pronunciation rules in English so fast, not a huge book please.

My dictionary lists the pronunciation of corps as [kɔːʳ], [kɔrz]. So, I am wondering if native speakers really pronounce the s sound?

Is it "The case' closure" or "The case's closure"? How exactly do I pronounce it?

I'm Japanese clueless about the difference in between the sound of L and R in the most case. I thought I should just give up, but it's too much obstacle to just ignore. (It's painful to remember ...

I'm having a hard time understanding native speakers when they speak like these examples below. 1. It's a book (of) pictures. I know native speakers tend to pronounce of as a schwa sound, but ...

I had a hard time trying this. I have known that I should bite my tounge when I pronounce "th". This sometimes goes well with words like "thick". However, every time I try to say "those", Siri will ...

I am able to pronounce the r in pretty much the standard way, but I still feel the faintest discomfort, especially when there are many r sounds in a row. On the other hand the trilled r is very ...

Watch this video, 00:16 . How do you pronounce "need to"? /niːd tə/ or /neɪt/ I think the professor said something like /neɪt/ in that video. The sentence: You need to be aware of its difference ...

I'm trying to refine my spoken English from scratch, and one of the biggest issue for me are the pairs of vowels: tense /i/ and lax /I/. I really can't tell the difference between them. I know that /i/...

I "wanted" to ask you ...? /wɒn.tɪd/ , but sometimes I heard /ˈwɒnɪd/ or something like /ˈwɒnidt/ Are there any differences between them? For example, you can also see and hear these two sentences ...

f(x) = x2 Having heard this read only in Korean, I don’t know how to read it in English. What is the right English reading?

How are "I love you" and "isle of view" pronunced? I ask because I'm not able to distinguish the differences, but surely an English mother tongue can, presumably in less than a fifth of a second.

I can’t hear the difference between /d/ and /th/ very well, though I know how to pronounce them. And it’s always hard for my tongue to use /th/, especially in the word “the”. Naturally I switch to /d/ ...

Which indefinite article should precede hour — a or an? an hour a hour Does the usage of an vs a depend on the pronunciation — a history, a hobby, but an hour, an honor?

How do I distinguish linking of two or more individual words ? For example : "Thank you", does not make sense to me as two words by English sound. My first language is Chinese. My purpose is find a ...

When do you pronounce ‹s› as /z/ in the middle of words? Is there any rule? I also saw there are some differences in articulating medial s between American and British accents. I already know the rule ...

In linked words, flapped T is pronounced such as (what if). Flapped T is pronounced when the T comes between two vowels. According to the previous rules, I expect to pronounce the flapped T in the ...

The chromite petered out in a month and a half, and he was lucky to break even. sound track That makes me very hard to hear clear.

Kingdom of the Crystal Skull I always can't hear clearly about "of", especially in "of the".

I am 99% sure Americans quite often flap the /d/ sound which comes right after /r/ in the phrases "Where did", "Where do", "Where don't" and "Where does" (I am talking about the initial /d/'s), and I ...

It is known that when the letter l is followed by a vowel then it is pronounced as light, and when it is at the end of a word or is followed by a consonant then it is pronounced as dark. But it is ...

Are there words in English with the letter C in which it's really pronounced as Z? By googling I found an old book which counts these words as in which letter C sounds like Z: suffice, discern, ...

sound example I have heard many times of the omitting of the "ed". But someone suggested that it should never omit the ed.

sound example There are some examples of "what it". Barely I can hear clearly the connective of the two words.

I think the pronunciation of the word madam is ma'am and it depends more on the tone than the vowels or consonants, right? If I can't pronounce it, is it better to pronounce the D in madam or to call ...

Are there words in which the letter D is pronounced like T (and they are not those words which ending with the past tense suffix of -ed)?

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