punctuation's questions - English 1answer

495 punctuation questions.

I'm confused because I see both versions on Google Books. Example sentence: "Hey, no eavesdropping next time, you hear?" she half(-)joked, half(-) scolded.

The list below is taken from Barbara Abbott's 'Definiteness and Indefiniteness.' My query is not related to the contents of the paper but it is about the punctuation she uses, about the use of ...

In this sentence from an editorial in Washington Post, "This outcome was not a given; complacency that it will continue would be dangerous." How will it change the meaning if I remove semicolon and ...

I've come to learn that when using colons, complete sentences should start with a capital letter. I'll demonstrate this with the following two examples, where the first is an appositive phrase and the ...

source A Game of Thrones In the end, she wrote four letters. To her mother, the Lady Catelyn Stark, and to her brothers at Winterfell, and to her aunt and her grandfather as well, Lady Lysa Arryn ...

please consider that English is not my first language :D thanks the sentence: [...], however, as he is not only holding onto the rope but is tied to it just like his counterpart, the native, [...] ...

I am wondering when I want to refer to for example, third instance of something, should the rd be superscript or subscript? What about when the exact digit is replaced with a variable like M?

Nick looks over at Pete, "Hey, how are you?"

I've learned that American English use double quotation marks and place periods inside quotation marks while British English use single quotation marks and place periods outside quotation marks. ...

The sentence is: These are the same people who make that noise after each sip, “Mmm-ahh”. Would the period be inside or outside the quotes?

My Mom kinda chuckles and says “Kevin, that’s because you’re using adrenaline to run away from the…creature.” Should I put punctuation after "says"?

The question is, should the 'should' in this sentence be capitalized? Also, is the type of that sentence interrogative or declarative or a mix of both?

A man is selling fruits and there are 3 kinds: apple, banana and melon. In the above sentence ":" is used, but if I do not want to use ":", how should I write a sentence? I am thinking of A man ...

I find the commas between coordinate adjectives unnecessary. For example, the followings seem to be both fine to me. It’s a bulky, heavy box. It’s a bulky heavy box. Is that so?

Where do you place punctuation when quoting a question? Also in general. I’m not sure whether to place the quotation mark before or after the punctuation mark. -“How can a young man cleanse his ways”?...

I am reading an article here: https://waitbutwhy.com/2014/12/what-makes-you-you.html When you say the word “me,” you probably feel pretty clear about what that means. It’s one of the things you’re ...

What's the correct option? I find both instances on Google Books, so I'm a little confused. Example sentence: Mary had black cat-eye shades and dyed blonde/dyed-blonde hair.

Example sentence: Under an advertisement screen (,) stood a Gothic Lolita. On her left(,) knelt a sweet Lolita. An ESL teacher told me to remove these commas. But at the same time, they seem ...

Using commas in a lot of languages are indispensable, however in English language frequently commas are absolutely redundant because of word ordering. My native language frequently influences me to ...

Example sentence: This was the first time she played the main character in a film---the movie of her life(,) in this case. Do I need the comma in this case? Note: I made a Google search. But ...

Could someone please tell me which of the two phrases is more correct (and why)?: They fly at speed in, or even above, the clouds. They fly at speed in, or even above the clouds.

You would vs. you’d

1 answers, 40 views punctuation
I’m wondering what is the correct punctuation in this sentence: My place works, unless you would/you’d like to have the meeting at your place.

Which one of the following is best?: Notice how on the surface he looks like he hasn't stolen anything. Notice how, on the surface, he looks like he hasn't stolen anything.

As in title. For example, "Where have you been?" she asked at home. "We don't know it." he said in that meeting. The sentence "where are you?" is grammatical. So, what would be the ...

This question is only about a whitespace between [year] and "BC". Do you write He was born in 123BC. or He was born in 123 BC. ?

What is the preferable punctuation when using equivalently in the middle of a sentence in order to give an equivalent interpretation of something as illustrated below? It minimizes the power ...

How can I start a sentence with however and hopefully? (In terms of semantic, grammar and punctuation) A typhoon is looming. However hopefully, we are leaving the city.

It’s well known that introductory phrases should be followed by commas. Here is an example: To stay in shape for competition, athletes must exercise every day. Consider now the following two ...

I’ve been reading a bit about apposition, and all the examples seem to be revolving around noun phrases. I’m wondering if adjectives can also form appositives. Consider, for instance, the following ...

I was writing a review on Goodreads and a question emerged after these sentences. When I was just a wee little boy I would finish this book thinking "Wow. Wonderland Rocks." Today I finished this ...

I learned that there should be no comma in a sentence like follows: The cheerleading squad went on a field trip to Yosemite National Park and spent 4 days there before heading back to Oregon. ...

When asking this question, I used three following sentences: In this manual I've met a sentence: During my classes, I was told that the double usage of the in structures like A of B is ...

In my language an exclamation point is used at the end of a sentence if it is emotional, an order or if you are asking something of someone. For example: I am angry! - conveys a strong emotion March ...

The sentence below is from Melville's Moby Dick. The main portion of the sentence--that is to say, the part of the sentence that conveys the main message--is "As I sat there in that now lonely room, I ...

My co-worker who is an English native speaker often makes grammar errors like follows: For example, Jane has an apple, and a banana. Robots, and Dolls are for kids. This really left me ...

THE SOURCE Becker found himself struggling to keep up — a new and exciting experience for him. Why is the sentence split up? I mean why the writer separate the phrasal verb "keep up" from "a new ...

These days I am studying about the different uses of em dash. What is the use of "em dash" here? The color pink has been my favourite. I have developed a passion for this beautiful color. I like ...

The first mobile phones were heavy and clumsy to use, but nowadays they are much easier to handle. I think there should be the comma after the word "nowadays" like in: "Nowadays, I bake my own ...

I was in a debate with my friend over the use of apostrophe. According to my friend, her university contest name ‘Financial student contest’ has no grammatical error. Whereas, in my point of view, ...

I am wondering if I need a comma in the following sentence. To further our understanding of this phenomenon(,) we conducted yet another experiment. If the sentence was the other way around (We ...

Examples: I strive, to get success to me. The old man with a beer bottle ran, to learn to run without spilling. An apple fell, to adhere to gravity. If commas don't work can you recommend what I ...

Can em dashes be used to separate prepositional phrases? So that phrase is only used as to modify the noun directly before it, and to the rest of the sentence is non-existent. Examples: Truth ...

I read this today: President Obama is speaking. In those amazing, full sentences with proper grammar, that we all love so much. Isn't this improper grammar? Shouldn't it be: In those amazing ...

Sorry, the question was pretty much confusing at best. Rather then editing it I decided to rephrase it from scratch. There are times when you're not quoting a person (or a book). Let me borrow a ...

I've learned that commas must be put before and, but, so, ect. However, I came across this sentence in a reading test. Exercise causes blood vessels to open up so blood flows more easily. Why is ...

They used to get paid on Wednesdays, but the factory had recently altered the schedule, and the shoemakers – the skivers, vampers, cutters, and stitchers; the trimmers, turn lasters, cementers, and ...

How can one differentiate between these two "Girl"? I mean I was not able to understand the sentence first is there any sort of punctuation missing in this sentence? Just want to clarify my ...

When quoting something said by someone else, should I use a comma before the quote? Suppose I quote the definition given in a dictionary. Am I correctly using the the punctuation marks in the ...

Maybe what you saw was a wild animal? A deer or a raccoon or a monkey(,) perhaps? Do I need the comma before perhaps?

I am a bit confused if I should use a comma in the folowing sentence: We can use this assumption since in our system, the rewards are bounded.

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